Pantry Basics

A Berry Easy Dessert
June 27, 2011 • Posted by Jennifer Perillo

Here in New York, we wait for the short window of time when strawberries come into season. While the hope is that each batch is filled with juicy, sweet berries, it’s inevitable that some need a little help. My solution for the tart berries in the bunch is to make jam. Recently, I realized if I took this one step further, I could have a tasty way to the beat the heat too with homemade strawberry frozen yogurt.

Step one is to make a jam-like sauce to mix with the yogurt base. It comes together easily in a small pot on the stovetop. If you make your own yogurt, then by all means use that for your frozen creation too. I went with Brown Cow vanilla yogurt in my test batches, and there were no complaints from the kids. Well, I did run out of ice cream cones, but those cries had nothing to do with the frozen yogurt itself. After all, what little girl could resist a pink-hued ice cream-like treat, dotted with sweet, juicy bits of strawberry? It was quite a hit with the adults too.

Strawberry Frozen Yogurt
Makes one pint

2 cups (8 ounces) strawberries, stems removed & berries sliced
1/2 cup (100 grams) natural cane sugar
1 tablespoon (15 ml) fresh squeezed lemon juice
Pinch of salt
2 cups (450 grams) low-fat vanilla yogurt

Combine the strawberries, sugar and lemon juice in a 2-quart pot over medium-high heat. Let cook until it begins to boil and the sugar is dissolved. Reduce heat to low, and let berries simmer until they reduce to a chunky, jam-like syrup. Remove pot from heat and let strawberries cool completely (this step may be completed up to 2 days in advance, and the cooked berries stored in the refrigerator in a covered container).

Add the yogurt to a deep mixing bowl. Using a rubber spatula, fold in the cooked strawberries. Pour the yogurt mixture into the chilled bowl of your Cuisinart ice cream maker and churn according to the machine’s directions. Transfer churned frozen yogurt to an airtight container and freeze until firm enough to scoop, 4 to 6 hours.

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