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Pantry Basics

The Potato
October 1, 2013 • Posted by Kalie Vitt

Potatoes are the number 1 leading vegetable crop in the United States and are available year round. Due to how easily the crop is grown, potatoes have become a very popular dietary staple. Not only is the potato low in fat and high in fiber, but potatoes also have more potassium than a banana and are packed with high amounts of vitamin C and B vitamins among other nutrients. Abundant, cheap and full of necessary vitamins and minerals, potatoes make the perfect side dish, ingredient or snack food.

When buying potatoes it is important to choose those that are smooth and firm with no green discolorations or sprouting. At home, store potatoes in a cool dark place such as a paper bag, avoiding counters with direct sunlight and the refrigerator. Refrigerating potatoes will convert the tuber’s starches into sugar and affect the vegetable’s taste. When baking, roasting, steaming, mashing or slicing potatoes – avoid removing the skin when possible, since this is where most of the nutrients are found.

Potatoes are not only affordable, but also satisfyingly filling. For centuries they have been consistently used in soups, salads and cakes to add a rich and creamy component to each dish. Although great on their own, there are seemingly endless possibilities for preparing the comfort food.

For a new take on the classic baked potato, try this Cuisinart Original Recipe for Warm Baked Potato Salad:

(May be assembled and served warm or chilled to serve later)

Ingredients


½ cup fat-free plain yogurt, strained to yield ¼ cup*
½ cup lowfat mayonnaise
1½ tablespoons fresh lemon juice or white balsamic vinegar
2 teaspoons Dijon-style mustard
2 teaspoons dill weed (dry; double if using fresh)
1 teaspoon kosher salt
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
3 “Almost” Baked Potatoes, still warm (recipe listed under Sides)
1 celery rib, thinly sliced
¹∕³ cup finely chopped red onion

Instructions

Place the strained yogurt, mayonnaise, lemon juice, mustard, dill, salt, and pepper in the work bowl of the Cuisinart® Food Processor fitted with metal blade. Process until blended and smooth, 20 seconds. Cut the potatoes into bite-sized pieces, including the skins. Place in a large bowl with celery and onions. Toss to combine. Add yogurt/mayonnaise mixture. Stir to coat potatoes. Serve warm, or cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.
*To strain yogurt, place in yogurt strainer or fine sieve lined with a paper coffee filter. Place over bowl and allow the whey to drain out; the yogurt will thicken and may be used as a spread or in dressings without being watery.

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